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Publication 17-CNA-010

Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

We-Tao Wu
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
weitaow@andrew.cmu.edu

Megan A. Jamiolkowski
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Pittsburgh, PA
and
Department of Bioengineering
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

William R. Wagner
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Department of Bioengineering
University of Pittsburgh

Department of Surgery
University of Pittsburgh
and
Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Nadine Aubry
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Northeastern University
Boston, MA 02115
n.aubry@northeastern.edu

Mehrdad Massoudi
Center for Nonlinear Analysis
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
and
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)
U.S. Department of Energy
626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940
Pittsburgh, PA 15236
massoudi@netl.doe.gov

James F. Antaki
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
antaki@cmu.edu

Abstract: In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm 1.6 mm 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 $\mu$m 75 $\mu$m and 125 $\mu$m 137 $\mu$m). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices.

Get the paper in its entirety as  17-CNA-010.pdf


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